ndelt

martes, 18 de noviembre de 2014

Jews and Arabs in the International Brigades: The Naftali Botwin Company

Jews and Arabs in the International Brigades

The Naftali Botwin Company

Gracias a todos los que vinisteis a ayudarnos, nunca os olvidaremos 

By Mitch Abidor  see the web page, here follows a summary: 

The Brigades drew largely from the parties of the Comintern, and it’s estimated that of the 35,000 members of the Brigades, between 6,500 and 8,000 were Jews. The largest contingent was in America’s Abraham Lincoln Brigade, but a large number of the Poles were also Jews; in fact they played a key role in many of the units of the International Brigades: even seventeen of Bulgaria’s 400 fighters were Jews. Palestine sent a mixed Jewish-Arab contingent of almost 200 fighters, which included Left-Zionists in its ranks, alongside members of the Palestine Communist Party. The largest proportion was in the Brigades’ medical corps, which was 70% Jewish


 

 

 

 

 




Eitan Bronstein and Zochrot

 Eitan Bronstein

http://zochrot.org/en


By the end of 2014 I will retire from Zochrot. Here is what I wrote about it.
I didn’t establish it, I started it
Now that I’m ending my work in Zochrot, I would like to tell you about how it all began.
Sometime in 2001, after a moving tour in the villages around Latrun, destroyed and depopulated by Israel in 1967, I conceived the idea of posting simple signs that will commemorate villages displaced in the Nakba. I shared it with friends and colleagues and one of them, Eran Shahar – editor of Hakibbutz – decided to publish it. A double page spread that included an interview with me and supporters and detractors of my idea was published on August 23. I feel it is important to give due credit to Shahar, whose words contributed to the creation of a second NGO – the first was Four Mothers.
Shahar’s story named dozens of kibbutzim built on the ruins of Palestinian villages, and I was naive enough – extremely naive – to suggest that they post modest signs to commemorate those destroyed villages. In the simple words of someone who grew up in a kibbutz and will always love it, with no sophistication or mediation, I approached them with an offer to take part in a new pioneering project. I tried to offer to several acquaintances from Kibbutz HaOgen to commemorate Wadi Qabbani, about which they knew well, but pretty soon I realized how far this idea was from their thoughts.
It was only then that I became aware of my own ignorance as to my birthplace, Kibbutz Bahan, located only two miles from Qaqun. I had to start Zochrot in order to “discover” that this was a displaced Palestinian village and not just a Crusader fortress as I was told as a child.
There was no Zochrot yet, no organization, just an idea that I shared with others. It was the responses I got which moved this idea forward. I’d like to think that Zochrot was created based on communicating with people and getting their response. It was built up on human interaction rather than as the outcome of strategic discussions or funds allocated for this initiative by an individual or a group of individuals.
So I started it, but I didn’t establish it. It was established by many who have responded to it and took part in it. I cannot but mention Norma Musih, who was my main partner in shaping Zochrot’s path until two years ago. Together we realized that Zochrot was not ours, and certainly not an end in itself, but a manifestation of our civil responsibility towards the society we live in.
Only recently, when representing Zochrot in Berlin (where else?) I voiced the insight that the initial idea of posting signs originated in my colonialist identity. We inherited the name reclaiming practice from our founding father Ben-Gurion, who had inherited it from great European conquerors before him.
Naming by sign posting is a proactive step typical of conquerors. Zochrot’s signs, which remind us of the enormous destruction carried out in order to establish the Jewish State, goes beyond solidarity with the occupied people. Together with the understanding that the country’s indigenous population pays the main price for the injustices of Zionism, it is the occupier who is the signs’ main target. They are designed to make Jewish Israelis acknowledge their own privileged status and go beyond guilt by taking responsibility for the Nakba. Only recognition of this kind can lay the groundwork for future reconciliation between Israelis and Palestinians.
Zochrot is something that happened between many people in the world, not only Israelis and Palestinians. For me, even Israelis actively opposed to Zochrot are part of the project. Even the Israeli government, which had passed a law without precedence anywhere in the world, providing for sanctions against state-funded entities that mark the Nakba Day, is part. The so-called Nakba Law – a response to the growing recognition of the 1948 catastrophe in Israel – served to deepen Israeli Jews’ awareness of their troubled recent history and ongoing violent history.
I headed Zochrot until early 2011, and since I left I worked on many related projects, the most notable of which where the Nakba Map, and the New KKL (JNF), presented together with Moran Barir at the Zochrot Gallery. In doing so I achieved exactly what I wanted – not to manage, but to promote and produce new knowledge about the Nakba and Jewish Israelis.
At the end of this year I will end my activity in Zochrot, but I’m not pulling back. On the contrary, I intend to take a closer look at what we’ve accomplished and write a book about this experience together with my wife Dr. Eléonore Merza – an anthropologist studying Israeli society. Precisely at a time when the organization I’ve started is undergoing such profound changes it seems important to me to document the move we’ve led to transform the Nakba discourse in Israel. This wouldn’t be a memoire but an analyses of our major milestones and the decisions we took, which I find relevant for anyone seeking to lead social change, not only in Israel. In addition, the book will describe the methods we’ve used and provide new materials on the issue to which I have devoted my life since 2001. In that, the book will embody one of our main principals: the knowledge that I gain as a political activist is not only mine, but must return to society in order to be part of the possible change.
This is a tremendous challenge but I’m glad to say that my passion to move forward is still there. At present, I’m working on my last project in Zochrot – upgrading the Nakba Map, the only one in Hebrew. The first edition I had edited is out of print, which serves as a proof for the importance and benefit of this work.
In these days of growing despair in Israel, I still believe that the key still held in the Palestinian refugees’ hands and the lock hole in our Zochrot logo both hold the key for a decent life in this country – a life of equality and peace for all the country’s inhabitants and refugees.
Photo by Eléonore Merza



http://zochrot.org/en

lunes, 10 de noviembre de 2014

Linux en Hebreo, Hebrew Linux


Linux en Hebreo, Hebrew Linux


This is about computing, and this is about learning Hebrew. If you have the interface of the OS and most of the applications in Hebrew, you will learn Hebrew even if you do not want it. If you are scared by that -having everything the other way round in the computer you are using, install the Linux Hebrew in a pendrive or in a virtual unit with VirtualBox. The video tutorials are about Ubuntu 11 (I am still with Ubuntu 10 (Lucid) but the version 14 is ready, I prefer the Lucid interface. The videos are in the page of this blog dedicated to Hebrew and Computing.




miércoles, 5 de noviembre de 2014

Chad Gadya

Israel is a beautiful country. Hebrew is such a sweet language... until you understand what they are saying. (old Israeli joke) So let's continue with our Hebrew course "Know thy Enemy" (old joke of mine)
Chad Gadya, a Passover song in the form of a spin-off or cumulative song, is not the most appropiate for the purpose of learning modern Hebrew. Chava Alberstein made some changes at the end of the traditional lyrics which provoked the prohibition in the National Radio. This is the relevant part: 

Why are you singing this traditional song?
It’s not yet spring and Passover’s not here.
And what has changed for you? What has changed?
I have changed this year.
On all other nights I ask the four questions, but tonight I have one more:
How long will the cycle last?
How long will the cycle of violence last?
The chased and the chaser
The beaten and the beater
When will all this madness end?
I used to be a kid and a peaceful sheep
Today I am a tiger and a ravenous wolf.
I used to be a dove and I used to be a deer,
Today I don’t know who I am anymore.
You can easily find the Hava's version in youtube, I've chosen this other by Arab & Jewish women's choir "Shirana" from The Arab-Jewish community center in Jaffa (Tel Aviv) The Hebrew and English lyrics below.
http://youtu.be/xoAw_J3CnUQ




Lyrics:
A little goat (2x)
My father bought for two zuzim
A little goat (2x).

Then came the cat
And ate the little goat
My father bought for two zuzim

Then came the dog
And bit the cat
That ate the little goat
My father bought for two zuzim

Then came the stick
And beat the dog
That bit the cat
That ate the little goat
My father bought for two zuzim

Then came the fire
That burned the stick
That beat the dog
That bit the cat
That ate the little goat
My father bought for two zuzim

Then came the water
That quenched the fire
That burned the stick
That beat the dog
That bit the cat
That ate the little goat
My father bought for two zuzim

Then came the ox
That drank the water
That quenched the fire
That burned the stick
That beat the dog
That bit the cat
That ate the little goat
My father bought for two zuzim

Then came the butcher
That slew the ox
That drank the water
That quenched the fire
That burned the stick
That beat the dog
That bit the cat
That ate the little goat
My father bought for two zuzim.

Then came the Angel of Death
And killed the butcher
That slew the ox
That drank the water
That quenched the fire
That burned the stick
That beat the dog
That bit the cat
That ate the little goat
My father bought for two zuzim

Then came the Holy One
Blessed be G-d
And destroyed the Angel of Death
That killed the butcher
That slew the ox
That drank the water
That quenched the fire
That burned the sticks
That beat the dog
That bit the cat
That ate the little goat
My father bought for two zuzim

On all nights, on all nights
I questioned only four
Tonight I have one more:
How much longer will the circle of horror persist
Striker and stricken, beater and beaten,
When will this madness, when will it end,
And what is different for you, what is different?
I am different this year
I used to be a lamb and a peaceful goat
Today I am a tiger and a preying coyote
I was a dove already, and a ram
Today I dont know who I am
(My father bought for 2 zuzim)
And once more, we start from the beginning



חד גדיא
חוה אלברשטיין
מילים: חוה אלברשטיין
לחן: עממי

דזבין אבא בתרי זוזי
חד גדיא חד גדיא
קנה אבינו גדי בשני זוזים
כך מספרת ההגדה

בא החתול וטרף את הגדי
גדי קטן גדי לבן
ובא הכלב ונשך לחתול
שטרף את הגדי
שאבינו הביא
דזבין אבא בתרי זוזי
חד גדיא חד גדיא

ואי מזה הופיע מקל גדול
שחבט בכלב שנבח בקול
הכלב שנשך את החתול
שטרף את הגדי שאבינו הביא

דזבין אבא...

ואז פרצה האש
ושרפה את המקל
שחבט בכלב המשתולל
שנשך לחתול
שטרף את הגדי
שאבינו הביא

דזבין אבא בתרי זוזי
חד גדיא חד גדיא

ובאו המים וכיבו את האש
ששרפה את המקל
שחבט בכלב שנשך החתול
שטרף את הגדי שאבינו הביא

דזבין אבא בתרי זוזי
חד גדיא חד גדיא

ובא השור ששתה את המים
שכיבו את האש
ששרפה את המקל
שחבט בכלב שנשך החתול
שטרף את הגדי שאבינו הביא

דזבין אבא בתרי זוזי
חד גדיא חד גדיא

ובא השוחט ששחט את השור
ששתה את המים
שכיבו את האש
ששרפה את המקל
שחבט בכלב שנשך החתול
שטרף את הגדי שאבינו הביא

ובא מלאך המוות והרג את השוחט
ששחט את השור
ששתה את המים
שכיבו את האש
ששרפה את המקל
שחבט בכלב שנשך החתול
שטרף את הגדי שאבינו הביא

דזבין אבא בתרי זוזי
חד גדיא חד גדיא

ומה פתאום את שרה חד גדיא?
אביב עוד לא הגיע ופסח לא בא.
ומה השתנה לך מה השתנה?
אני השתניתי לי השנה
ובכל הלילות בכל הלילות
שאלתי רק ארבע קושיות
הלילה הזה יש לי עוד שאלה
עד מתי יימשך מעגל האימה
רודף הוא נרדף מכה הוא מוכה
מתי ייגמר הטירוף הזה
ומה השתנה לך מה השתנה?
אני השתניתי לי השנה
הייתי פעם כבש וגדי שליו
היום אני נמר וזאב טורף
הייתי כבר יונה והייתי צבי
היום איני יודעת מי אני

דזבין אבא בתרי זוזי
חד גדיא חד גדיא

קנה אבינו גדי בשני זוזים
ושוב מתחילים מהתחלה.

 






domingo, 2 de noviembre de 2014

Learn Hebrew With Israeli Movies And Award-Winning TV Series “Shtisel”

Learn Hebrew With Israeli Movies And Award-Winning TV Series “Shtisel”


 
When I first started learning Hebrew, I used a very popular overpriced software which promised to make learning a new language simple and intuitive. But after a few days of clicking on colorful stock photos of smiling people and saying...
 




Asterix in Hebrew

Asterix in Hebrew

AsterixAsterixאסטריקס
ObelixObelixאובליקס
VitalstatistixDa–GoullixדגוליקסIn Hebrew, "Dagoul" means "great", "magnificent", "majestic". Which, in short, is Vitalstatistix! What's more, "Dagoul" sounds like a certain "De Gaulle", seen by our foreign friends as the archetypical chief of the contemporary Gaulish tribes.
CacofonixDoraymixדורחמיקסCacofonix is "Doraymix" in Hebrew. The bard amongst our indomitable Gauls is in fact famous for his very personal "mix" of musical notes…
ImpedimentaVitaminויטמין Impedimenta is never short of energy when complaining about the shortcomings of her "Piggywiggy" husband. Perhaps this is what inspires her name in Hebrew: "Vitamin"!
DogmatixMavrixמבריקסDogmatix in Hebrew is called "Mavrix"! Nothing to do with the American television series Maverick or the cinema character of the same name played by Mel Gibson. "Mavrix" actually derives from the Hebrew word "Marvrik" meaning "brilliant" or "genius".
GetafixAshafixאשפיקס"Ashafix" comes from "Ashaf" meaning "magician", someone who can perform miracles…
UnhygienixIxdrixאיכסדריקס"Ixdrix" in Hebrew recalls the expression of disgust "Ichsss". Might there be a link here with the disputed freshness of Unhygienix? Here's a clue: Fulliautomatix apparently took part in the brainstorming which led to this choice of name…
CaesarKeissarקיסר"Keissar" is the Hebrew translation for Caesar and "emperor".

http://www.asterix.com/the-collection/translations/asterix-in-hebrew.html